LIGHTSPEED SABER ACADEMY
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KNIGHTHOOD

The Lightspeed knighthood program challenges you to gain strength, agility, knowledge, and technical mastery. You will be challenged in seven trials per each knight level (known as machs). These challenges are physical, technical, and intellectual. They do not require formal participation in any tournaments. So even if official competition is unpalatable to you, you can still become a knight.

Below, you will find the requirements to become a Mach I Lightspeed Knight.

 
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TRIAL OF SKILL

In the Trial of Skill, students perform the Rey I beginner dulon. Each movement is judged for its efficacy and efficiency.

Passing criteria: 66% score

TRIAL OF KNOWLEDGE

Mastering Rey I means more than simply mastering its execution. It also means knowing the name of every move, its purpose, and some of the combat theory from which it was created. This is tested through a traditional multiple choice exam.

Passing criteria: 70% correct

TRIAL OF STRENGTH

While Lightspeed-saber fencing trains many skills, and its participants make major gains in speed, agility, and stamina, strength is not a major component. The Trial of Strength, entailing a pushup goal, ameliorates this deficiency.

The passing criteria is set uniquely for each individual.

TRIAL OF AGILITY

Lightspeed-saber fencing stands for agility as much as it stands for speed. This is tested through a series of ladder drills. Stay on your toes, be quick, concentrate, and don’t mess up!

Passing criteria: Completion of the Gauntlet Drill with no mistakes

 

TRIAL OF CONTROL

Any combat-sport not based on submitting or scoring knockouts or damage necessarily requires mature participants that know how to be fast without being brutal. The Trial of Control tests a fencer’s ability to attack key targets without hitting any off-targets. This necessarily requires attacking with care and awareness, both of the opponent of the fencer themself.

Passing criteria: 80% accuracy in 50 contacts

TRIAL OF SYMMETRY

In Lightspeed-saber fencing, we value balancing offense and defense. Afterall, the root of both words is the same as the term “fencing” itself. Therefore, an imbalanced fencer is an incomplete fencer. In the Trial of Symmetry, students are challenged to score a minimum number of “assaults” (attacks to deep target), “returns” (defensive counterattacks), “cleans” (killing and not being killed), and 3-pointers (some combination of the previous three).

Passing criteria: 10x assaults, 10x returns, 10x cleans, & 10x 3-pointers